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Our Rayos del Sol Organic Peru is back for the second straight year and better than ever, with flavors of apricot, pear and lime. We see it as the anchor of our exciting and expanding menu of Peru single-origin offerings.
  • SKU 220002
  • Country Peru
  • Region within Country San Ignacio
  • Elevation 1700 - 1850 m.a.s.l.
  • Farm Rayos del Sol
  • Farmer / Producer Name Percy Pintado
  • Buyer Jay Cunningham
  • Cultivar Bourbon
  • Harvest Time June - November 2017
  • In Season Yes
  • Direct Trade Yes
  • Single Origin Yes
  • USDA organic Yes
Direct Trade 1
Single Origin 1
In Season 1
USDA organic 1
CitrusAppleStone Fruit

Rayos del Sol Peru

Planting Seeds

Café Solidario is a relative new cooperative based in San Ignacio, in the North of Peru. Its 40 members are led by a team of four coffee veterans who believe that identifying the very best lots of coffee, separating them and processing them meticulously is the best way to ensure good prices for the cooperative’s members.

But the cooperative isn’t all about coffee. This year it has also started an ambitious public health project in Alto Ihuamaca, where clinics are sparse and access to health services is limited and where the kinds of basic check-ups we take for granted can be profound.

First Rays

From the lab, it is a three-hour climb up serpentine Andean roads to the small village of Alto Ihuamaca. It is the home of Percy Pintado, owner of Finca Rayos del Sol, and his brothers Jeffrey and Dionisio. The three Pintado brothers are neighbors whose farms lie next to one another’s, and in the ancient Andean tradition of the minga, they share the the labor needed to bring their beautiful coffees to market.

When we pulled up at Percy’s house, where we were greeted warmly by the Pintado brothers and made some coffee together before and touring Percy’s small backyard mill. Percy proudly showed us what was new this year, which turned out to be quite a lot: a nursery of about 50 Geisha seedlings, a water harvesting tank, a depulper, a compost bin and multi-tiered raised drying beds. This small mill handles the overflow from a larger mill at the farm itself, another few kilometers away.

Percy also runs a small general store selling supplies and dry goods that doubles as a warehouse for his coffee: when I visited, the first sacks of parchment coffee from this harvest were stacked in the dry, cool, storeroom next to big bags of dried beans and rice. We had a delicious lunch of rice, plantains, potatoes and roast chicken and discussed his approach to coffee and the importance of drying. I had the pleasure of explaining to Percy that his coffee had made an appearance in the U.S. Barista Championships the prior year in Seattle, a long way from the muddy footpath we walked to access Finca Rayos del Sol.

Bourbon and The Bee

Skinny Bourbon trees lined the footpath, which cuts through an older part of the farm. Like his brothers, Percy has been busy planting new sections of the farm with young Bourbon seedling that have started producing. The cherries were juicy and very sweet, even the ones we picked from the scrawny older Bourbons. As we walked the farm, we discussed varietals, roya, and the role of quality in path forward for Percy and his family.

The old farmhouse at Rayos del Sol has a corrugated steel roof with adobe brick walls and an uneven dirt floor packed to a smooth polish over so many years of use. Percy had laid boards over the upper eaves to create an attic drying area accessible by ladder that was filled with parchment coffee.

While Percy showed us the small depupler above the farmhouse, Jeffrey was stung by a bee. Everyone paused as he picked the small bee off his shirt and placed it gently on the concrete edge of the fermentation tank. It was slowing down, its end drawing near. We talked about the bees and the important role they play on the farm as agents of pollinization. We paused in silence as the bee slowed and grew still, an act of reverent, gentle respect for nature from these stoic men.

Percy has delivered beautiful coffees to us for two straight seasons, but his mind is still not at ease. He is concerned about the capacity of his mill and plans to continue expanding his drying beds as his earnings allow. I tried to reassure him by telling him that the coffee he, his brothers and their neighbors have sent us tastes great, that we will be back again next year and the year after that, that the coffee and has potential to get even better, and that in the end our shared success based on a mutual commitment to quality was the only true path forward.

Coffee Credits

Minga

In Alto Ihuamaca, the indigenous agricultural tradition of collective action known in Peru and throughout the Andes as minga is still very much alive and well:
family, friends and neighbors pool labor to help one another with the harvest.
The individuals on the minga list are growers on their own farms and workers on the farms of the others.

Percy Pintado
Mary Carhuachinchay Abad
Yomer Pintado
Odar Pintado
Mary Pintado
Dionisio “Milqueades” Pintado
Freddy Calle
Over Pintado
Rosmery Pintado
Yefry Pintado
Paulina Huaman
Ketty Pintado
Silvio Pintado
Melinda Peña
Romario Pintado
Ronaldo Pintado

Pickers

Temporary field workers hired during harvest time

Elauterio García García
Rolando Arica García
Isidro Farsaque Chinchay
Ronaldo Carhuachinchay
Noe Quiti Abad
Neptali Jiménez Abad
Alejandro Pintado Rivera
Santos Merino Alberca
Pepe García Rivera
William Rivera Abad
Manuel Huamán Rivera

Transportation

Sebastián Carvajal
Geiner La Torre

Cupping Lab

Alex Julca
José Rivera
Junior Quiroz
María Alberca
Iván Cruz Rivera
Freddy Julca Rangel
Elvis Julca Rangel

Logistics

Jajaira Guerrerro
Pamela Echeandia

Finance and Administration

Omar Maluquiz
Freddy García

Dry Mill Team

Luz Inga
Rubén Espinoza
Milagros Ramírez
José Vega
Miguel Paredes
Geiner Sánchez Heredia
Agustín Vásquez Jara
Gilmer Vásquez Idrogo
Adán Cabrejos Pérez
Édgar Vásquez Hernández

Espresso

Espresso

All home and commercial espresso machines.

Turkish Grind

Turkish Grind

If you need a little bit coarser grind for your espresso machine or utilize this favorite preparation in eastern Europe.

Stovetop Espresso

Stovetop Espresso

Moka pots and stovetop espresso kettles need a very fine grind.

Cone Filter - Paper

Cone Filter - Paper

Most automatic and electric brewers utilize this grind setting.

Cone Filter - Gold

Cone Filter - Gold

Automatic brewers with reusable mesh filters, or a Kone manual brewing insert.

Universal

Universal

If you're buying for a friend, or are just not sure - this is a good grind for most drip brewers.

Technivorm

Technivorm

We found this excellent automatic brewer needed a bit coarser grind than other cone filter brewers.

Vacuum Brewer

Vacuum Brewer

For those with an electric or flame-heated vacuum brewer.

Flat Bottom - Paper

Flat Bottom - Paper

Any basket-style brewer, including automatic and Kalita wave manual brewing.

Flat Bottom - Gold

Flat Bottom - Gold

For automatic brewers with basket-style reusable filters.

French Press

Hario Dripper

Manual pourover cone brewing is a simple, no frills way of brewing.

Grind Type

French Press

A classic of immersion brewing. Select this grind for perfect classical preparation.

Chemex

Chemex

The iconic Chemex, this grind provides a perfectly paired offering for the special filters made for this brewer.

Percolator

Percolator

Our coarsest grind, this also provides a good pre-ground solution for cold brew at home.

Whole Bean

Whole Bean

For those with a grinder at home, we love freshly ground coffee! We prefer burr grinders for a more even brew.