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This edition of Tres Santos Colombia was grown on the El Bado farm in Buesaco by Cielo and Nilson López, just down the road from Cielo’s father, who grew our La Mina Colombia Limited Reserve. Black Cherry | Tamarind | Candied Apple
  • SKU 204001
  • Country Colombia
  • Region within Country Buesaco, Nariño
  • Elevation 1700 - 1950 m.a.s.l.
  • Farm El Bado
  • Farmer / Producer Name Nilson López
  • Buyer Geoff Watts
  • Cultivar Castillo, Caturra, Colombia
  • Harvest Time May - July 2017
  • In Season No
  • Direct Trade Yes
  • Single Origin Yes
  • USDA organic No
Direct Trade 1
Single Origin 1
CitrusTropicalSpice

Tres Santos Colombia

Oh, when the saints come marching in

The latest installment in our Tres Santos Colombia lineup continues the joyful parade of new lots from the most prolific producer of tantalizingly flavorful and unapologetically exuberant coffees in the Americas. Colombia is a coffee buyer’s dream: year-round production, regional diversity that produces a broad spectrum of taste attributes from a narrow range of varieties, and a motivated farmer population that embraces challenge with an inspiring vigor. There are few places in the world capable of hanging with Colombia when it comes to creating a bounty of coffees of such obvious vitality and complexity that they grab our attention at first sip.

Colombia’s coffees are like its salsa dancers: both have a kind of swagger, and both are remarkable for their grace. This coffee parade started in Nariño with two elegant smallholder lots from our friends at Arcafé. Now it is making a northward migration, with a stop in Sotará, Cauca, before heading to San Agustin, Huila. This procession will demonstrate how Colombian farmers from different regions leverage their skills to take fullest advantage of the country’s enviable environmental conditions.

Oh, when the drums begin to bang

Dance and music animate the soul and drinking an amazing coffee can do the same. You don’t need to know how it was made to appreciate it. But when you do it can elevate that appreciation beyond the raw sensory pleasure we receive from a delightful cup. Understanding the sheer amount of work and persistence that goes into the creation of these stunning coffees--and how unlikely they really are--deepens our respect. It takes several years of effort and careful management of the trees to bring a simple cup of coffee to fruition. To make a great one usually requires even more years of trial and error and learning, with many failed attempts behind every success. The growers we are working with throughout Colombia are men and women who have dedicated themselves to the craft of producing coffees in a way that preserves the beauty that nature intended. All of them enter each season anew, bringing with them the experiences of prior years to aid them in their attempts to make coffees of exceptional character. Their best efforts don’t always yield magic: the huge number of variables that need to align to result in an extraordinary coffee mean that every coffee can’t be a masterpiece. But those who commit to sound principles are able to produce coffees that are good, and sometimes great. Once in a while they go further, and cross the line into sublime. Part of our job in these collaborations is to sort through the entire harvest and pick out the most compelling ones to showcase.

Oh, when the horsemen begin to ride

Dance and music animate the soul and drinking an amazing coffee can do the same. You don’t need to know how it was made to appreciate it. But when you do it can elevate that appreciation beyond the raw sensory pleasure we receive from a delightful cup. Understanding the sheer amount of work and persistence that goes into the creation of these stunning coffees--and how unlikely they really are--deepens our respect. It takes several years of effort and careful management of the trees to bring a simple cup of coffee to fruition. To make a great one usually requires even more years of trial and error and learning, with many failed attempts behind every success. The growers we are working with throughout Colombia are men and women who have dedicated themselves to the craft of producing coffees in a way that preserves the beauty that nature intended. All of them enter each season anew, bringing with them the experiences of prior years to aid them in their attempts to make coffees of exceptional character. Their best efforts don’t always yield magic: the huge number of variables that need to align to result in an extraordinary coffee mean that every coffee can’t be a masterpiece. But those who commit to sound principles are able to produce coffees that are good, and sometimes great. Once in a while they go further, and cross the line into sublime. Part of our job in these collaborations is to sort through the entire harvest and pick out the most compelling ones to showcase.

Oh when the trumpet sounds its call

For this edition of Tres Santos, we’ve picked a coffee from a small group of growers in Sotará, Cauca, that we’ve been working with for just over two years. Last year we purchased our first lot from a group of trailblazers we call Pioneros de Sotará, comprised of single-farm lots from each of the first eight growers we met in Sotará. That original group of visionaries was small, but their example inspired another 30 growers to join the project. This year we’ve got nearly 80 growers involved.

Between mid-July and early October we carefully sorted through and evaluated coffees from all 80 of them, organizing them by grades and paying careful attention to the nuances. Those with the most outstanding clarity, sweetness and flavors rose to the top and ride proudly into the shelves carrying the Tres Santos banner.

There are four producers responsible for this coffee: Benito Garzón, Belizario Quiñonez, Benito Rocero, all from Sotará, and Gerardo Escobar from El Tambo, who deserves an extra round of applause for his impressive consistency: this is the fourth consecutive year that his coffee has been among the top lots we’ve tasted from the Cauca region. After two delicious lots from Nariño, this sizzler from Cauca delivers flavors of bergamot, pomegranate and candied ginger.

Tres Santos is a full-on party this year. Do you want to be in that number?

Espresso

Espresso

All home and commercial espresso machines.

Turkish Grind

Turkish Grind

If you need a little bit coarser grind for your espresso machine or utilize this favorite preparation in eastern Europe.

Stovetop Espresso

Stovetop Espresso

Moka pots and stovetop espresso kettles need a very fine grind.

Cone Filter - Paper

Cone Filter - Paper

Most automatic and electric brewers utilize this grind setting.

Cone Filter - Gold

Cone Filter - Gold

Automatic brewers with reusable mesh filters, or a Kone manual brewing insert.

Universal

Universal

If you're buying for a friend, or are just not sure - this is a good grind for most drip brewers.

Technivorm

Technivorm

We found this excellent automatic brewer needed a bit coarser grind than other cone filter brewers.

Vacuum Brewer

Vacuum Brewer

For those with an electric or flame-heated vacuum brewer.

Flat Bottom - Paper

Flat Bottom - Paper

Any basket-style brewer, including automatic and Kalita wave manual brewing.

Flat Bottom - Gold

Flat Bottom - Gold

For automatic brewers with basket-style reusable filters.

French Press

Hario Dripper

Manual pourover cone brewing is a simple, no frills way of brewing.

Grind Type

French Press

A classic of immersion brewing. Select this grind for perfect classical preparation.

Chemex

Chemex

The iconic Chemex, this grind provides a perfectly paired offering for the special filters made for this brewer.

Percolator

Percolator

Our coarsest grind, this also provides a good pre-ground solution for cold brew at home.

Whole Bean

Whole Bean

For those with a grinder at home, we love freshly ground coffee! We prefer burr grinders for a more even brew.